Un-Cruise Adventures:  Just the ticket—for your mind, body, and soul. Rivers of ice, beach combing and wilderness hikes, Glacier Bay, kayaking, and skiff exploration all share the stage. Uncover Alaska’s special tonic. Cloud failure or liquid sunshine, our Alaska small ship adventure discovery cruises are perfect for exploration—paddling, hiking, hot tub under the stars, “polar bear plunges,” even playing in the mud with your expert expedition team. Glacier Bay National Park; Native totems; breaching whales; soaring eagles; rain-forests; northern lights.

Explore Alaska with the Safari Explorer or the Wilderness AdventurerBoth vessels are adventure equipped with kayaks, paddle boards, skiffs, hiking poles, wet suits and snorkel equipment, and yoga mats. The EZ Dock launch platform makes getting into the water a cinch. A hydrophone transmits below-surface sounds and a bow-mounted underwater camera shows the action. For wellness and relaxation, the vessels offer two hot tubs and fitness equipment.

Highlights:

  • Two days in Glacier Bay
  • Kayak, hike, and skiff in Glacier Bay
  • Park ranger joins you on board in Glacier Bay
  • Whale watching in Icy Strait, Frederick Sound, and Stephens Passage
  • Explore coves and fjords of Chichagof and Baranof Islands
  • View stunning glaciers and listen for the “white” thunder
  • Cathedral-walled Fords Terror Wilderness Area
  • Captain’s Choice—explore remote “not in the guidebook” places

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ITINERARY
Day 1: Juneau, Alaska
– Embarkation
Arriving in Juneau, you will be transferred from the airport to our hospitality area. Upon boarding, your crew greets you with champagne and smiles. Set sail for a week of scenic channels and secluded wilderness.

Day 2: Glacier Bay National Park
Accompanied by a National Park Ranger in the park, you’ll travel nearly 60 miles cruising up-bay to the tidewater glaciers of Grand Pacific and Margerie, which frequently calve huge icebergs into the bay. If conditions permit, we’ll lower the skiffs and weave among the icebergs that have fallen from the face of the glaciers. Enjoy an evening at anchor, and mornings paddling your kayak in the quiet of this majestic wilderness. Glacier Bay is at its best when explored by small groups with unfettered time for treks and kayaking inside the bay and wilderness areas.

Day 3: Glacier Bay National Park
Enjoy another exclusive day exploring the glaciers and wildlife of Glacier Bay National Park.

Day 4: Icy Strait
Join the Captain on the bridge or go on deck with your Expedition Leader. Late afternoon, we’ll drop the skiffs and kayaks for closer inspection of the remote coastline with eyes set on shore for possible bear sightings. This evening, take in the solitude while relaxing in the upper deck hot tub or enjoy a nightcap with your fellow yachtmates in the salon

Day 5: Chicagof Island/Baranof Island
With no binding agenda, today you’ll cruise the waterfall coast of Chichagof Island. Marvel at the grand scenery of Alaska’s wilderness as the crew expertly guides you through those “not in the guidebook” places known only to the locals. This evening, perhaps tucking away in a waterfall-laced fjord, there’ll be time for skiffing, beachcombing or treks ashore, and kayaking to look for sea otters and bears before calling it a day near Baranof Island.

Day 6: Frederick Sound/Stephens Passage
Spend the day exploring in Frederick Sound and Stephens Passage—another excellent chance to view humpback whales and other marine wildlife. Pass by Five Fingers Lighthouse and watch for playful antics at a large sea lion haulout made from dozens of rocky islets. Later, cruise picturesque bays, where evergreen forests crowd the shores.

Day 7: Fords Terror/Endicott Arm
Explore this majestic fjord by kayak or skiff, a unique opportunity indeed. View rugged ice-covered mountains gleaming high overhead and a glacier that actively calves into the ice-filled fjord of Endicott Arm. Toast your voyage with a festive Farewell Dinner, and before turning in, your Expedition Leaders will share a “photo journal” of your trip together.

Day 8: Juneau – Disembark
Gather for breakfast before returning to historic Juneau. Transfer to the Juneau airport or begin your UnCruise hotel stay or land tour. Safe travels to all!

 

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DATES
Departure dates in 2017
April: 29th
May: 6th, 13th, 20th, 27th
June: 3rd, 10th, 17th, 24th
July: 1st, 8th, 15th, 22nd, 29th
August: 5th, 12th, 19th, 26th
September: 2nd, 9th, 16th, 23rd


RATES
April 29th, May (9th & 13th) & September (2nd & 9th) Cruises
Navigator: $3,395
Trailblazer: $4,195
Pathfinder: $4,595
Single: $5,095
Charter: $238,895
Port taxes/fees: $250

May (20th & 27th) & August (26th) Cruises
Navigator: $3,795
Trailblazer: $4,595
Pathfinder: $4,995
Single: $5,695
Charter: $262,895
Port taxes/fees: $250

June, July & August (5th, 12th, 19th) Cruises
Navigator: $4,395
Trailblazer: $5,195
Pathfinder: $5,595
Single: $6,695
Charter: $298,895
Port taxes/fees: $250

September 16th & 23rd Cruises
Navigator: $2,995
Trailblazer: $3,795
Pathfinder: $4,195
Single: $4,495
Charter: $214,895
Port taxes/fees: $250

What’s Included: Onboard meals; spirits, wine, beer; non-alcoholic beverages; transfers and baggage handling between airport/vessel on embark/disembark day; entry fees to national parks/preserves; all from-the-vessel activities and equipment.

 

PORTS OF CALL
Baranof Island
The second island in the ABC islands of Alaska, Baranof Island is also known as Sitka Island. It eloquently sits at the northern end of the Alexander Archipelago in the Alaska Panhandle surrounded by glacier-carved fjords, hanging valleys, old-growth temperate rainforests and sheer granite mountains. Baranof Island is the tenth largest island in the United States and is mostly covered by the Tongass National Forest.

Chicagoff Island
Chichagof Island is the 5th largest island in the United States and one of the ABC islands of Alaska. It sits at the northern end of the Alexander Archipelago. Separated from Baranof Island by the Peril Strait to the north, Chichagof Island has the largest population of bears per square mile of any place on earth and is protected by the West Chichagof-Yakobi Wilderness area.

Endicott Arm
Endicott Arm is one of two narrow fjords that make up the Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness area. Over 30 miles long, it ends at the stunning and breathtaking Dawes Glacier. With calm waters and only the sound of glacial caving, harbor seals, bears, deer, wolves and a wide variety of birds call this area home.

Fords Terror Wilderness
Bounded by Canada on the east and bordered by the Chuck River Wilderness to the south, the Tracy Arm-Fords Terror Wilderness is highlighted by two sheer-walled fjords, Tracy Arm and Endicott Arm, both narrow and deep and over 30 miles long. At the head of both fjords, tidewater glaciers calve regularly into the sea. Permanent ice covers about one-fifth of the Wilderness.

Frederick Sound
Frederick Sound is a body of water approximately 45 miles wide in the central part of Southeast Alaska, at the confluence of Portage Bay (West), lower Stephens Passage (North), and Chatham Strait between the communities of Juneau (North) and Petersburg (South). Frederick Sound is only accessible by boat or air.

Glacier Bay National Park & Preserve
Visiting Glacier Bay Park is also like visiting a wildlife park. Here bears, goats, moose, whales, sea otters, and all the creatures of the water and forest flourish, completely protected from man. A National Park Ranger joins us for our entire journey to explain the park’s geology, glaciology, wildlife, and its deep roots in Tlingit culture.

Icy Strait
Icy Strait is a body of water in Southeast Alaska that is located between Chichagof Island and the mainland, and extends 40 miles northwest from Chatham Strait to Glacier Bay and Cross Sound. Icy Strait’s nutrient-rich waters are abundant with marine mammals, sea birds and the scenery is spectacular.

Stephens Passage
Running between Admiralty Island to the West and Douglas Island to the east, Stevens Passage is a 170km long channel in the Alexander Archipelago. Stephens Passage was named in 1794 by George Vancouver, probably for Sir Philip Stephens. It was first charted the same year by Joseph Whidbey, master of the HMS Discovery during Vancouver’s 1791-95 expedition.

 

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Posted in Beaches, Historical Tours, Kayaking, Sailing, Sightseeing, Snorkeling, Un-Cruise Adventures and Un-Cruise Adventures: Alaska

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